Archive for October, 2012

Presidential Inbox 2013: U.S.- India Relations

RPI co-PI Deepa Ollapally,  associate research professor of international affairs at GWU, discusses three key challenges facing the next U.S. president in relations with India.

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US Presidential Election and Views from Asian Powers (Part II)

Today’s post is the RPI’s second installment of a three-part series on the US presidential election. We examine reactions in India, China, Japan, South Korea and Russia to the foreign policy issues addressed in the televised debates between President Barack Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney.

 

INDIA

Across the spectrum of India’s media landscape, commentary took note of the striking similarity between Obama and Romney on foreign policy.

  • Some think this can be a positive development for India. “The good news for both sides is that US-India ties have transcended electoral politics,” wrote Chidanand Rajghatta, a Times of Indiacolumnist. Moreover, the lack of any mention of India in the debate just shows that America is “absorbed in managing its own decline,” leaving India in the “happy position of being geopolitically close to the US and yet able to maintain strategic autonomy.”

CHINA

As was noted in RPI Policy Alert #37, Chinese views on the US election continue to criticize the anti-Chinese rhetoric by both candidates. (more…)

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New Oxford Book by RPI Authors Henry R. Nau and Deepa Ollapally

About the Book

Worldviews of Aspiring Powers provides a serious study of the domestic foreign policy debates in five world powers that have gained more influence as the US has weakened: China, Japan, India, Russia and Iran.

Featuring leading regional scholars for each country, the volume identifies the most important domestic schools of thought–Nationalists, Realists, Globalists, Idealists/Exceptionalists–and connects them to the historical and institutional sources that fuel each nation’s foreign policy experience. While scholars have applied this approach to US foreign policy, this book is the first to track the competing schools of foreign policy thought within five of the world’s most important rising powers. Concise and systematic, Worldviews of Aspiring Powers serves as both an essential resource for foreign policy scholars trying to understand international power transitions and as a text for courses that focus on the same.

Acclaim for the Book

“These essays are an innovative effort to identify and explain common themes in the foreign policy thinking and formulation of the world’s most important aspiring powers. An attentive reader will come away with a sharper understanding of both the pace and the direction of global change and the implications of that change for American power abroad.”

– Jim Hoagland, The Washington Post  

“The authors and editors of this volume should be commended for showing readers how the varied histories, religions, and traditions of leading countries inform their approach to world affairs. Policymakers and students alike will find this book essential reading as they struggle to make sense of and make policy in our 21st century world.”

– Walter Russell Mead, Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow for U.S. Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations

“The old division of domestic and foreign policy is over. But the emerging foreign policy views of the rising powers are not well understood. I welcome this volume as a serious attempt to explain some of the big new forces reshaping the international system.” 

-Rt. Hon. David Miliband, UK Foreign Secretary 2007-2010   

“This volume is imaginatively conceived and wonderfully executed. Addressing this theme requires a combination of historical scholarship, political judgment, and analytical acuity. The essays in the volume display these qualities in ample measure. There is no volume of comparable scope. It ought to command wide readership.”

– Pratap Bhanu Mehta, President & Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research 

Get your copy of Worldviews here.
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First US Presidential Debate Evokes Reflections from Asian Powers

The US presidential election is being closely watched by Asia’s rising powers. Today’s post highlights Indian, Chinese, and Russian commentary on last week’s debate and the upcoming election between President Barack Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney.

INDIA

Describing the first debate as “a low-key, at times pedantic, exchange,” The Hindu anticipated that in the next debate on foreign policy issues, “Washington’s disastrous policies in West Asia and Afghanistan may be examined, forays that neither Mr. Obama nor his challenger seems to know how to handle.”

On a different note, columnist Tavleen Singh in The Indian Express used the occasion to “brood over how many Indian political leaders could hold their own in such a debate,” lamenting the dynastic nature of Indian politics and the failure of political leaders to “sell India a new dream.”

CHINA

Chinese commentators took issue with the extent of campaign rhetoric that has been critical of China: (more…)

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Interview: China Prepares for Transition to New Government


With the fall of Bo Xilai, an outspoken voice of opposition and reform, the Chinese government revised its selection for new leadership in China’s Communist Party. Margaret Warner of PBS recently spoke with the RPI’s David Shambaugh for more on what the decision to oust Bo means for China and its ruling party. A transcript of the interview is available here.

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